SEO

Link tag rel=canonical – The ultimate Guide to SEO

Link tag rel=canonical - The ultimate Guide to SEO

Link tag rel=canonical is a way of telling search engines which page should be indexed for a set of URLs. If you have two pages with duplicate content, one URL can use the rel=canonical tag to signal to search engine crawlers which URL is the original or canonical version of that content. If a page uses a link tag rel=canonical, then any pages that link to that page will also inherit the canonical value.

This includes paginated content and other web pages. By using the rel=canonical tag, you’re able to control which version of your content appears in search engines and whether or not they show up in multiple places on the web. In this guide, we’ll teach you everything about the advantage of using this tag and how to use it correctly.

What is a rel=canonical link tag?

A rel=canonical link tag is a way of telling search engines which page should be indexed for a set of URLs. If you have two pages with duplicate content, one URL can use the rel=canonical tag to signal to search engine crawlers which URL is the original or canonical version of that content. If a page uses a link tag rel=canonical, then any pages that link to that page will also inherit the canonical value. This includes paginated content and other web pages.

By using the rel=canonical tag, you’re able to control which version of your content appears in search engines and whether or not they show up in multiple places on the web.

Why should I use the rel=canonical link tag?

The rel=canonical link tag is used to tell search engine crawlers which URL is the original or canonical version of that content. If you have two pages with duplicate content, one URL can use the rel=canonical tag to signal to search engine crawlers which URL is the original or canonical version of that content. By using the rel=canonical tag, you’re able to control which version of your content appears in search engines and whether or not they show up in multiple places on the web.

When your site has duplicate content available for download, it can be difficult for crawlers to determine which page should be indexed for a set of URLs. That’s where the link tag rel=canonical comes into play. This tells crawlers which URL is the authoritative source so indexing will be consistent across all pages.

The SEO benefit of rel=canonical

One of the most common mistakes many webmasters and SEO specialists make is duplicate content. If you’re trying to rank for a certain keyword and you already have a page that ranks on page one of Google, it’s tempting to submit a different version of that page to other search engines like Bing or Yahoo – this is called duplicate content.

Instead of duplicating your content, you should use the link tag rel=canonical. Whenever you add a new page, try to add the rel=canonical tag with it. This way, when people click on your website from another search engine or social media website, they’ll always see the original version of your content and not one that’s been duplicated elsewhere.

There are some exceptions to this rule: if you’re using canonical URLs as “cloaking” (or hiding) pages to trick search engines; if you want to block specific sections of your site; or if there are paginated webpages available. But in general, it’s best for SEO professionals and webmasters alike to use the rel=canonical tag for all websites.

There are also benefits when linking different paginated web pages on your site together. Paginated webpages are often found on sites with large amounts of content like blogs, online newspapers, and other publishers’ sites that have a lot of articles and need to display their content in smaller chunks. When these types of websites use paginated webpages, it’s important to know how many pages there are and what order

Should every page specify a canonical URL?

The canonical URL is a signal to search engines that one URL can have multiple URLs, so the same content appears under the same URL in different places.

It’s not necessary for every page to specify a canonical URL. If you have two pages with duplicate content, one URL should use the rel=canonical tag to signal to search engine crawlers which page is the original or canonical version of that content. If a page uses a link tag rel=canonical, then any pages that link to that page will also inherit the canonical value. This includes paginated content and other web pages.

So if you want one URL to be indexed for all versions of your content, then include the rel=canonical tag on each webpage containing duplicated or similar content.

When should I specify a canonical URL for a page?

The first time you have duplicate content, you should specify the canonical URL. Let’s say that your web page has two or more URLs that all have the same content. One of those URLs will be designated as the canonical URL.

If you don’t tell search engine crawlers which URL is canonical, they’ll pick one at random to index. This means you could end up with duplicate content indexed by search engines and it may be difficult for users to find your content.

To avoid this issue, specify the canonical URL for each page containing duplicate content. You can use a link tag rel=canonical to designate the pages with identical content as one version of that page.

Can search engine crawlers ignore canonical tags?

Canonical tags allow webmasters to specify which URL they prefer search engine crawlers to index. Search engine crawlers are required to follow the canonical tag, but they are not required to crawl the other pages.

Factors that make Googlebot ignore canonical tags

Canonical tags are not always effective. There are a number of factors that can make Googlebot’s ignore canonical tags, such as:

* The canonicals do not match the URL of any content on the page.

* The canonical link is on a different domain than the original page.

* The canonical tag appears within a comment or heading and is not linked to any other part of the document.

* The canonical tag is pointing to another site that you don’t control (such as an ad or social media page).

* The canonical tag points to an image file instead of an HTML page.

* The canonical tag has been used multiple times for content across your website, often with different URLs. Google may incorrectly index some of these pages in its search results because it doesn’t know which one should be indexed as the original version.

Conclusion

Up until this point, all the tags you’ve seen have been about telling search engines what to do with your page. A canonical link tag tells the search engine which of the pages on your site is the canonical, or official, one. When you specify a canonical URL for your page, you’re telling the search engine that this is your preferred version of that page and that it should index this version of the page, not any other versions of the page.

The reason for specifying a canonical URL is twofold. First, this helps prevent duplicate content issues. This means that you’ll be able to rank for your preferred keywords without having to worry about Google penalizing you because you’re showing up for the same keyword on multiple pages. The second reason is that specifying a canonical URL can help prevent duplicate content issues. This means that you’ll be able to rank for your preferred keywords without having to worry about Google penalizing you because you’re showing up for the same keyword on multiple pages.

This means that if your website has a blog, for example, and one page on the blog is about ‘how to cook a turkey and another page on the blog is about ‘how to cook a ham,’ then

1 Comment

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